Amplified MRI (aMRI)

Amplified magnetic resonance imaging (aMRI), a promising image processing tool developed by Mātai’s scientists and collaborators. aMRI visualises brain motion as the heart beats and shows the movement of the brain in ways that have never been seen before.

aMRI holds promise for diagnosing obstructive disorders of the brain which alter the intracranial pressure – such as hydrocephalous and Chiari I malformation.

We are also investigating whether we can use aMRI to extract the biomechanical properties of brain tissue quickly and non-invasively. This could have applications to many disease states that affect brain tissue viability, such as neurodegenerative disease and traumatic brain injury.

The brain is influenced by the motion of the heart. Brain motion, invisible to the naked eye, can be picked up using a novel technique called amplified MRI (aMRI). aMRI has the potential to visualise pathological brain motion and extract altered biomechanical properties of the brain.

The aMRI video here shows a normal 5 year old patient, and a 5 year old with Chiari I malformation with increased mid-brain, spinal cord, and frontal lobe motion.

World’s first demonstration of exquisite cardiac-induced brain motion in-vivo using amplified MRI developed by Mātai’s scientists and collaborators.
The aMRI video here shows a normal 5 year old patient, and a 5 year old with Chiari I malformation with increased mid-brain, spinal cord, and frontal lobe motion.

SJ Holdsworth, W Ni, G Zaharchuk, M Salmani Rahimi, M Moseley. Amplified Magnetic Resonance Imaging (aMRI), Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, 75(6):2245-54 (2016).

I Terem, W Ni, M Goubran, M Salmani Rahimi, G Zaharchuk, K Yeom, M Moseley, M Kurt, SJ Holdsworth. Revealing sub-voxel motions of brain tissue using phase-based amplified MRI (aMRI). Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (2018). In journal’s top downloaded from January 2017 and December 2018.